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Ranger & the 'Re-Arrangers': Bio

THE BAND   Ranger and his father Michael formed Ranger and the "Re-Arrangers" in 2006, after returning from the Django Reinhardt festival in Samois, France. In the years since, the band has released 3 CDs and played over 500 shows, including summer concerts, festivals, swing dances, art openings, and weddings.

Violinist RANGER SCIACCA     “At the heart of their sound is Ranger Sciacca's sweet violin playing… his sense of melody and daring improvisations” (World Rhythm Webzine) Ranger began playing violin at the age of six. He followed two parallel tracks of study--fiddle tunes with renowned Seattle fiddler Stuart Williams, and classical improvisation with Alice Kanack, an internationally-known violinist and author. A chance encounter with a CD of violin jazz ignited Ranger’s interest in the playing of Joe Venuti, Stuff Smith, Stephane Grappelli and Django Reinhardt. Ranger’s playing draws from all the genres he has studied, and, according to one reviewer, “features frantic staccato runs, pizzicato plucking that keeps one on the edge and an overall sense of tone that reveals many shades and moods.”

Bassist TODD HOUGHTON      began performing, teaching, and producing music in the 1960’s in Colorado. He has played guitar, bass and keyboard in jazz, folk, rock and C&W groups since then. He has composed for commercials, films and live theater. In addition to his private students and independent studio work, Todd has hosted an “open mic” on Bainbridge Island, Washington since 1993. Blind since the age of seven, Todd is an advisor to Jack Straw Production’s Blind Youth Audio Project.

Percussionist JEFFREY MOOSE    has a 35 year career in music and fine art. His collaborations and band projects include work with Joined at the Head, Heliotroupe, Dog Superior, Stiff Kitty, Atoke, Zayah=20Emmanuel, and Sam Andrews, founder of Big Brother and the Holding Company. Born in Mexico and raised in West Africa and Arlington, Virginia, he is the director of the Jeffrey Moose Gallery in Seattle.

Mandolinist DAVE STEWART    began his musical studies in Tacoma, Washington playing classical piano. Since discovering the mandolin in 2005, Dave has played ceaselessly. He now performs with a 5 string electric mandolin and a tenor guitar as well as a traditional mandolin. Dave is an accomplished digital animation artist.

Rhythm Guitarist MICHAEL SCIACCA     is Ranger's father, and has been backing up Ranger on guitar for over 10 years. Ranger and Michael are descended from Sicilian immigrants, who played jazz in New York at the start of the 20th century.

Guitarist DARIN LOCKE     studied at the prestigious Guitar Institute of Technology in Hollywood, CA. He has split the last decade between Bremerton, WA and Austin TX, teaching, recording, and performing. Darin is an accomplished musician in many different genres; while based in Austin, he toured the United States with alternative-country band Micky and the Motorcars, and played rhythm guitar for gypsy jazz group Django's Moustache. 

  

AWARDS & HONORS--The band has won several accolades and awards: FINALIST Independent Music Award (2007 and 2009), Best Song, World Traditional Category WINNER, Global Rhythm Magazine Song Contest, Gypsy Moon (April 2007)

BAINBRIDGE REVIEW 2013:

Bainbridge Islander Ranger Sciacca and his father Michael had no idea their trip to Europe would end in a turning point in both their musical pursuits.

Nor did they know it would ultimately bring about the gypsy jazz quintet, Ranger and the ‘Re-Arrangers.’

But upon their arrival to the town of Samois sur Seine, France in 2006 for the annual Django Reinhardt Festival, it was clear they would be taking the experience home with them.

The Sciaccas have attended a Django festival every year since. And in September 2011, they even landed a stage performance with their group Ranger and the ‘Re-Arrangers’ at the largest Reinhardt festival in the U.S. that takes place on Whidbey Island.

In France, the two spent the five-day festival jamming all day and attending the main stage performances in the evening. The real fun was behind the main stage, Ranger Sciacca said, where pockets of musicians were set up jamming everywhere.

A circle would form around one or two artists losing it on their instruments. A crowd would gather where a 12- or 13-year-old would be playing better than most of the older more seasoned festival-goers. Musicians from all over the world milled around with their instruments in hand: fiddle, guitar, upright bass. Gypsys were allowed free entrance.

But it wasn’t the fanaticism encircling the gypsy jazz genre Reinhardt is known to have birthed that sparked inspiration in the Sciaccas.

“It was just the music itself,” Sciacca said.

By that time father and son had already performed side-by-side for many years (Michael on guitar, Ranger on violin).

Ranger Sciacca started playing jazz as a violin student with long-time Island Music Guild instructor Stuart Williams and with songs like “Lady Be Good” by George and Ira Gershwin. He remained Williams’ student for the bulk of his adolescence. Around the same time, his father began performing alongside him on guitar. They started out performing for children’s dance classes, farmers markets and art gallery exhibitions.

Though “Lady Be Good” still has a place with Ranger Sciacca, nowadays, it’s Reinhardt’s “Minor Swing” that the Sciaccas and their band the ‘Re-Arrangers’ find themselves going back to over and over again.

“It’s a great starting point for improvisation,” Sciacca said as he hummed the familiar tune.

His inclination to improvise while performing or practicing is what won him the nickname ‘re-arranger’ as a student...Williams joked that Sciacca instead liked to re-arrange the music. The catchy name stuck after the instructor jokingly introduced him as the ‘Re-Arranger’ at a student performance.

This reputation isn’t too far off from what earned the renowned Reinhardt his notoriety as a musical prodigy. Reinhardt was a master improviser, and it’s this element that in many ways has come to define gypsy jazz.

Nonetheless, Sciacca and his father went to France knowing just enough about the genre and the Django Reinhardt Festival to be interested in learning a different style of music.

They departed, however, knowing they would have to pull a band together if they wanted to bring out the heart of the gypsy jazz sound and Reinhardt’s legacy.

It was the summer of 2006. By the end of the year, the two had gathered a talented group of like-minded ‘re-arrangers’: bassist Todd Houghton, percussionist Jeffrey Moose and mandolinist Dave Stewart. With Michael Sciacca on rhythm guitar and Ranger Sciacca on violin they formed Ranger and the ‘Re-Arrangers.’

The group has since established a name for themselves in the Northwest’s gypsy jazz scene. They have two albums already produced and another expected to come out in March.

On top of their regular performances in and around Seattle, though, they continue to honor the artist that inspired it all...with their annual Django Reinhardt Birthday Celebration every January.

“I probably talk a little more about the history of gypsy jazz and Django,” Sciacca said, but he assures that it’s a party first and foremost.

 

 

 

Heritage Music Review recently told our story better than we could ourselves:

 

RANGER AND THE RE-ARRANGERS: PLAYING GYPSY JAZZ ON THEIR OWN TERMS (By Doug Bright)

Of all the genres of roots music that this publication covers, none is being preserved more successfully in the Seattle area than the Gypsy jazz style developed in France during the 1930's by guitarist Django Reinhardt and violinist Stephane Grappelli, and no one is more aware of that happy fact than Michael and Ranger Sciacca, leaders of a father-and-son-based band called Ranger and the Re-arrangers. "Western Washington really is a center for this kind of music," Michael observes. "DjangoFest, that's the biggest festival in North America. When we went to France we'd say, "We're from the West Coast," and they'd say, "Whidbey Island?"" Nevertheless, not all gypsy jazzers are created equal. "We have to be a little careful in that world that we don't portray ourselves as something we're not," Michael continues. "To be a gypsy jazz band without a lead guitarist, it's like we're tryin' to be a Dixieland jazz band without a trumpet. We are adding mandolin and we have percussion. Almost no gypsy jazz band has percussion of any sort besides guitars." Despite these anomalies, the Re-arrangers' sound is essentially Gypsy swing and vintage Parisian cafe. Though not nearly as famous yet as their local peers Pearl Django, they expect their new CD, DJANGO'S TIGER, to help them change that situation. The Sciaccas' musicality is deeply rooted in their Sicilian-American family heritage. "My mother's cousin Johnny is still alive, and he's a violin player," Michael elaborates. "I haven't had the courage to talk to him much about it, but the rumor was that Johnny was in the Philharmonic in Rochester, New York. My mother's uncle was from Sicily and he was sort of a center of the musical storm. I sat around and played with him a few times. He could play clarinet, he had a banjo-headed mandolin and a violin and a guitar, he could play them all, and he could play jazz. I recorded a very homemade recording with him before he passed away at the ripe age of 95." Born and raised in Rochester, Michael Sciacca started out on accordion at the age of seven and took up guitar at about 13. "I spent most of my adult life being a campfire guitar player," he says modestly. "I never began performing until Ranger started playing." Sciacca and his family came to the Seattle area and settled on Bainbridge Island almost twenty years ago when Ranger was three or four years old. "I started studying classical violin when I was five," Ranger recalls, "but within two or three years, almost as soon as I had learned how to play the violin and could play songs, I was doing two simultaneous tracks." Ranger Sciacca's second musical track was an unlikely one for a classical violin student. "Ranger was only seven or eight years old at that point," his father explains. "He had a wonderful classical teacher, but he was growing a little bored." The solution came in the person of Stuart Williams, a respected scholar, teacher, and practitioner of old-time fiddling who had started journeying from his home in Seattle to teach for two days a week on Bainbridge Island. "Stuart taught me a little bit of everything," Ranger recalls. "He taught me Scandinavian tunes and French-Canadian tunes and some Texas swing tunes, and consistently, the ones that I would like the most would be the jazzy tunes. I think he taught me "Lady, Be Good". That was my favorite for a long, long time!" Ironically, it was a family crisis that led to the next important stage of Ranger Sciacca's musical development. "My dad had died, and I did some elder care with my mom," Michael explains, "so between the years 1997 and 2003 we moved to Rochester for about half the year. I always considered it a formative time in Ranger's musical career. He was studyin' fiddlin' for six months out of the year with Stuart, and then he had the opportunity to work with Alice Kanack." Kanack's unique approach had developed from working with Dr. Shinichi Suzuki, the renowned violin teacher whose regimen injected a healthy dose of ear training into classical instruction. "She publishes books through Time Warner on classical improvisation," Michael Sciacca elaborates. "Alice starts her books with a small introduction to say that in her opinion the great composers were improvisers. Alice takes that perspective, and in addition to individual lessons she brings groups of the kids in and has a group improv lesson. She sits there and plays these amazing background licks on the piano, and she tells those kids, "Forget about the notes on the page, forget about the songs you know, just go where your fingers go," so Ranger had some huge advantage." Given Ranger Sciacca's grounding in classical yechnique, folk fiddling, and improvisation, what happened next was virtually inevitable. At some point during the years spent hopping from coast to coast, he discovered a two-disc French compilation called VIOLON JAZZ (jazz violin) that included every master of the art from Stephane Grappelli to Stuff Smith to the Italian-American who started it all in the 1920's, Joe Venuti. "Before then," Ranger recalls, "I was already liking the jazz tunes that Stuart taught me and the improv that I did as part of my classical studies, but after that, I knew where I really wanted to go with this." Michael and Ranger Sciacca began their performing career on a modest scale, furnishing music for a children's dance class at the Waldorf School in Rochester. "They'd teach the kids folk dances and contra dances," Ranger remembers, "and we were the music for that." "They were very much into the arts," Michael adds, "and every Tuesday at one o'clock we'd show up. I think maybe I was even pullin' out my accordion at that point, and sometimes I'd play guitar." The next breakthrough in the Sciaccas' musical development resulted from Washington Old Time Fiddlers Association workshops featuring two of Seattle's most respected swing fiddlers, Paul Elliott and Paul Anastasio. "This western swing guitar player, Pam Borso, ran a parallel track with both of those guys where you learn ten swing tunes in the violin class and then guitar players would learn those same swing tunes," Michael explains. "That really enabled me to get the basic swing idea down." From that point onward, the Sciaccas honed their skills playing local art gallery exhibitions, where they always managed to sell a few copies of the homebrew CD's they produced in their living room. "We would get a microphone and plug it in and just do a real scratch deal," Michael remembers, "and we'd sell three or four of 'em. One of 'em was very modestly titled JAZZ REVOLUTION. We did that for a number of years." By the time Ranger graduated from high school in 2005, the Sciaccas had gained plenty of valuable experience playing school functions, art studios, and farmers' markets. It was finally time to document their sound properly. "Somewhere at the beginning of that summer," says Michael, "I realized Ranger was goin' away to college. We said, "Maybe we should just capture what we have." We found a recording studio: an amazing place called Trillium Studios that has since been turned into a horse barn. It had isolation booths and a mixing board that was bigger than our living room!" The resulting CD, GYPSY MOON, featured Ranger Sciacca in a program that blended jazz standards like "After You've Gone", "Undecided", and "I Found A New Baby" with a couple of Ranger's originals, including the tango that served as the album's title tune. In addition to his father on rhythm guitar, he was backed on bass and drums by brothers Jherek and Korum Biscoff, prominent members of the Bainbridge Island music scene. "Korum and Jherek would just nail what we thought was a complicated arrangement the first time," Ranger remembers. "They just picked it up like out of nowhere. That CD was pretty interesting: it's not pure Gypsy jazz at all. We put it in the local CD store, and when we were asked to play at a local harvest festival or studio tours at art galleries, we'd always sell our CD, but it wasn't big." "We really didn't think of ourselves as somebody who would be selling CD's outside of a show or a farmers' market," Michael adds. The next landmark in the Sciaccas' musical life was a pilgrimage to Europe in the summer of 2006. "We went to France, to the Django Reinhardt Festival," Michael elaborates. "We didn't know a person there, but we met some really nice people, and Ranger wandered around and jammed. I certainly was not to the point where I was takin' my guitar out in front of that group, but I wouldn't be too embarrassed to do it now." The biggest boost to Michael Sciacca's confidence came with a stop in Belgium. "We stayed with Lollo Meier, who's one of the premier people on the world Gypsy jazz scene," Ranger explains. "We had gotten in touch with Lollo before. We got to learn some songs and some improvisation skills from him, and Dad learned some chords and some Gypsy strumming technique." Inspired by their European adventure, the Sciaccas renewed their promotional effort, sending their new CD out to the venues most likely to hire them, but as offers started coming in, they realized it was time to put together a more permanent ensemble. "Korum is a graphic artist and Jherek is all over the world with music," Michael explains, "so we knew that we didn't really have a band." The solution came with the gradual addition of bass guitarist Todd Houghton, mandolinist Dave Stewart, and percussionist Jeffrey Moose, all active in the local music community. "We already knew Todd Houghton, the bass player, quite well," Ranger explains. "For both Jeff and Dave, we said, "Hey, why don't you come to this gig with us?" After they came a couple times we just started asking them regularly, and they just became part of the band." By the spring of 2007 the new five-piece edition of Ranger and the Re-arrangers was complete, and after two consecutive summers spent performing every weekend, the band had polished up enough material for an album project. The resulting CD, DJANGO'S TIGER, recorded toward the end of 2008, features violinist Ranger Sciacca and mandolinist Dave Stewart, backed by their solid and tasteful rhythm section on a wide variety of American jazz standards, international fare, and originals that fit their broadly defined Gypsy swing and Parisian caf`e orientation. The title tune is a brisk two-beat number with a slight western swing flavor and showcases some of the soloists' snappiest improvisation. Sciacca and Stewart are stylistically well matched, and their sense of teamwork is the band's most striking aspect. On the jazzy, upbeat tracks like "Lulu Swing", "Dark Eyes", the spirited Brazilian number "Nao Me Toques", and the continental European fiddle tune "Beatrice", their interplay is characterized by plenty of call-and-response line-trading and some brilliant harmony. When in Parisian waltz mode, the emphasis is on playing the melody in unison, approaching the texture of the French musette accordion style. Although it lacks the impassioned vibrato that characterized Stephane Grappelli's early work with the quintet of the Hot Club of France, Ranger Sciacca's approach to jazz violin certainly reflects the Gypsy master's sense of drive and syncopation. Nevertheless, it's the Quintet's legendary lead guitarist, Django Reinhardt, who provides most of Sciacca's inspiration. "I think when I listen to the old Gypsy jazz recordings," he says, "I'm tryin' to sound more like Django. I never play the Django lead all the way through, but I'll just throw in little references: a lot of fun." Ranger and the Re-arrangers' two CD's are available on their website, www.rangerswings.com, through a link to the popular independent music retailer CDBaby.com. "I think DJANGO'S TIGER prompted us to get on CDBaby," Ranger says. "We don't really sell a terrible amount of things through there, but pretty frequently someone will e-mail us and say, "I heard you when I was in Seattle, and I live in Denver," or, "I want to buy a CD for my mom in Massachusetts," so it's really a good tool. The majority of our sales are at gigs."

HERITAGE MUSIC REVIEW, a monthly guide to early rock, blues, country, folk, and traditional jazz in the Seattle area and beyond is free to e-mail subscribers and is supported by tasteful, music-oriented advertising with a unique news-format approach. . Editor and Publisher: Doug Bright E-mail: subscribe@heritagemusicreview.com.

Article from the Bainbidge Review, 2009:

 Ask the members of Ranger and the Re-Arrangers “Why Django Reinhardt?” and there’s a moment of thoughtful silence. Um. Where does one even start? “His music, this ‘Gypsy Swing’ or ‘Gypsy Jazz,’ is now a genre,” guitarist Michael Sciacca said. “So it gives you an idea of his prestige among artists.” Michael and his son, violinist Ranger Sciacca, built a band around the trademark sound brought to prominence by the now revered guitarist in the late 1930s, in partership with violinist Stephane Grappelli. Ranger and the Re-Arrangers’ second CD, “Django’s Tiger,” exalts what Ranger calls Django’s sometimes simple, sometimes virtuosic and completely unmistakable sound. The fact that Ranger’s violin takes center stage in contrast to Django’s guitar, Michael said, is proof of the genre’s flexibility and universality. The band, which also includes Todd Houghton on bass, Dave Stewart on mandolin and Jeffrey Moose on percussion, will celebrate the release of “Django’s Tiger” at a free concert tomorrow evening at the Bainbridge Commons. Ranger and crew recorded and mixed the CD in Edgewood, and mastered it on Bainbridge. The process leading up to recording lasted a year, Ranger said, as they selected seven songs to interpret, including Django’s “Tiger Rag,” from which the album title comes. Ranger wrote three original tunes as well. The planning and lead time paid off; the band was in and out of the recording studio in two days. “Django would go in and record everything in one take,” Ranger said. “He would just play it, record it and leave. We didn’t quite do that.” The band left some room for error in the studio; as Ranger pointed out, Gypsy Jazz is a forgiving music. Nonetheless, he tried to run a tight ship and infuse “a certain level of intentionality” into the recording. The resulting collection offers up range of moods, just as the genre itself does, as Ranger pointed out. The title song showcases the pure joy and fun of Gypsy Jazz – the kind that has made the Re-Arrangers so popular on the weekend concert circuit – with Ranger playing bright and spirited fiddle. Their interpretation of “Doin’ the Uptown Lowdown” is fast-paced but minor-keyed, artfully conveying Harry Revel and Mack Gordon’s “ups” and “lows.” And Ranger’s “Tin Rain,” which the band describes as “slightly more avant garde,” mixes an Eastern European sound with Asian influences and, improbably, the plaintive sounds of Appalachia. When he composes, Ranger said, he usually begins with the melody; he’ll get a line or a fragment and build a composition and arrangement from there. He finds the process self-referential – sometimes, he’ll get what he thinks is a new tune going in his head and then realize it was actually something he’d already written. Given the nature of jazz, though, he rolls with it. The day before recording began for “Django’s Tiger,” for instance, Ranger couldn’t let go of the tune “Charmaine” from their first album, “Gypsy Moon.” So he laid it over the title track on this one. Get the CD and listen closely, he said. Next up for Ranger is more music. Having graduated in May from Whitman College, where he became heavily involved in the outdoor program, he’ll continue to make the outdoors a priority. He recently completed a six-week stint in Forks as part of a knotweed eradication crew and plans to lead student trips. But the band also has a steady schedule, mostly off-island, that includes festivals, parties, weddings – anywhere a celebration is in order. “I definitely will work around the music, whatever it is,” he said.